Section 62. Conditions for committal to psychiatric care

An offender who is unaccountable pursuant to section 20, second to fourth paragraphs, may be committed to psychiatric care by court order when he or she has committed or attempted to commit an offence that violates another person's life, health or freedom or that might endanger these legal interests, the special sanction is necessary to protect society, and the risk of another serious violation of someone's integrity seems likely.
An offender who is unaccountable pursuant to section 20, second to fourth paragraphs, may also be committed to psychiatric care by court order when he or she has committed repeated offences that are harmful to society or particularly bothersome, the special sanction is necessary to protect society against such offences, the risk of further offences of the same type seems particularly likely, and other measures have proven clearly unsuitable.
When assessing the risk of reoffending, emphasis shall be given to the offence committed in the context particularly of the offender's general conduct, illness history, current mental state and relationship with alcohol and drugs.
A person may also be committed to psychiatric care when the offender's state of unaccountability meant that he or she was in factual ignorance, see section 25, or the offender was otherwise in a state not compatible with having intent.